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Undetectable CrossRAT malware targets Windows, MacOS, and Linux systems Beware!

Undetectable CrossRAT malware targets Windows, MacOS, and Linux systems Beware! 


Most Of Cybercriminals are now using a new piece of 'undetectable' spying malware that targets Windows, macOS, Solaris and Linux systems.
Although the report revealed about the group's successful large-scale hacking operations against mobile phones rather than computers, it also shed light on a new piece of cross-platform malware called CrossRAT (version 0.1), which is believed to be developed by, or for, the Dark Caracal group.



CrossRAT is a cross-platform remote access Trojan that can target all four popular desktop operating systems, Windows, Solaris, Linux, and macOS, enabling remote attackers to manipulate the file system, take screenshots, run arbitrary executables, and gain persistence on the infected systems.

According to researchers, Dark Caracal hackers do not rely on any "zero-day exploits" to distribute its malware; instead, it uses basic social engineering via posts on Facebook groups and WhatsApp messages, encouraging users to visit hackers-controlled fake websites and download malicious applications.
CrossRAT is written in Java programming language, making it easy for reverse engineers and researchers to decompile it.

The Crossrat-malware :
Since at the time of writing only two out of 58 popular antivirus solutions (according to VirusTotal) can detect CrossRAT, ex-NSA hacker Patrick Wardle decided to analyse the malware and provide a comprehensive technical overview including its persistence mechanism, command and control communication as well as its capabilities.

CrossRAT 0.1 — Cross-Platform Persistent Surveillance Malware
Once executed on the targeted system, the implant (hmar6.jar) first checks the operating system it's running on and then installs itself accordingly.
Besides this, the CrossRAT implant also attempts to gather information about the infected system, including the installed OS version, kernel build and architecture.
Moreover, for Linux systems, the malware also attempts to query systemd files to determine its distribution, like Arch Linux, Centos, Debian, Kali Linux, Fedora, and Linux Mint, among many more.

CrossRAT then implements OS specific persistence mechanisms to automatically (re)executes whenever the infected system is rebooted and register itself to the C&C server, allowing remote attackers to send command and exfiltrate data.

As Reported by Lookout researchers, CrossRAT variant distributed by Dark Caracal hacking group connects to 'flexberry(dot)com' on port 2223, whose information is hardcoded in the 'crossrat/k.class' file.
CrossRAT Includes Inactive Keylogger Module
crossrat-commands
The malware has been designed with some basic surveillance capabilities, which get triggered only when received respective predefined commands from the C&C server.

How to Check If You're Infected with CrossRAT?
Since CrossRAT persists in an OS-specific manner, detecting the malware will depend on what operating system you are running.

-->For Windows:
Check the 'HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run\' registry key.
If infected it will contain a command that includes, java, -jar and mediamgrs.jar.
-->For macOS:
Check for jar file, mediamgrs.jar, in ~/Library.
Also look for launch agent in /Library/LaunchAgents or ~/Library/LaunchAgents named mediamgrs.plist.
-->For Linux:
Check for jar file, mediamgrs.jar, in /usr/var.
Also look for an 'autostart' file in the ~/.config/autostart likely named mediamgrs.desktop.

Users are advised to install behaviour-based threat detection software. Mac users can use BlockBlock, a simple utility developed by Patrick that alerts users whenever anything is persistently installed.


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